S. T. Fleming

Language. Education. Literacy. Creation.

Author Archive

Travel Article 2

Part 1: Introduction

What is the goal of the introduction?                            http://goo.gl/QJmVUU

How do I start?

1 more way to begin…

Let’s Get Started

1. Name of the place you will be writing about (e.g. Minnesota)

2. 1st introduction: You know/ You don’t know

Minnesota, located in the United States along its northern border with Canada, is known for cold, bone chilling cold and -40ºF wind chills.  As a matter of fact, International Falls, Minnesota is called The Nation’s Icebox!  Did you know, though, that Minnesota is also the land of 10,000 lakes for fishing, swimming and water skiing? (And water skiing was actually invented in Minnesota!)  Here are some beautiful summer places to explore Minnesota.

3. 2nd introduction: In the middle of it all

As I ride my bike around Lake Harriet in the heart of Minneapolis I hear the sounds of Jazz coming from the bandshell and the ropes clanging against the sailboat masts.  A group of runners pass me going in the opposite direction making way for the older couple out for an evening stroll.  This is summer in Minneapolis and I have only begun to taste what summer in Minnesota has to offer.

The World’s Largest Lesson

Please be aware of the Global Goals for Sustainable Development.  You can find more information here: https://www.tes.com/worldslargestlesson/ and you can choose your language in the upper right hand corner.  This is important!!

La lección más grande del mundo

How to Write a Travel Article

Part 1: Introduction

What is the goal of the introduction?                            http://goo.gl/QJmVUU

How do I start?

1 more way to begin…


Sidewalk Poetry

WCCO TV published a report tonight about St. Paul Sidewalk Poetry.  What fun!  And even better, they showed my poem:

Let’s Talk
Said one young man to his young bride,
“I’m so sad my dad just died.”
“Let’s talk of it,” she softly cried.
“Um, I just did,” the man replied.

If you live in St. Paul, MN and would like to enter a poem in this year’s contest follow this link:

Now in Peru!

Last Thursday night we arrived in Lima, Peru!  This will be home for the foreseeable future.

We have been enjoying the company of family and friends; we have been searching out places to live; we have been learning from and working with some amazing people; we have been looking for and creating work, ways to share what we know while continuing to grow in knowledge.

There are amazing possibilities in this city of 10 million!  If you are looking for a literacy/ language teacher and coach please let me know; I would love to talk to you about the possibilities.

Minnesota State Fair

I love the Minnesota State Fair!  I try to go at least twice a year when I am in Minnesota.  While there is lots and lots of food, there is also much to learn, arts and crafts, animals, …  If you go, be sure to check out the Education Building to learn about options for post-secondary education.  Amazing possibilities!

Here is a view from the Space Tower at the Minnesota State Fair:

Listen, Watch then Teach

When working with my students in language and literacy I am always looking for data.  I don’t, however, rely much on standardized scores and summative assessments.  While helpful in a very small way, those types of assessments give me information more about me, the teacher, than about the student.  I look for data that I can use.

Every time I have a conversation with students I make notes about their learning, sometimes mental notes and sometimes written notes.  I try to keep track of their use of language and their thinking.  Every time I read student writing I make notes about their use of language, their ability to express themselves and their accuracy.  This is the data that I use.

This is the real-time data that shows me what students know and can do right now.  That data is then turned into large group, small group and individual instruction as needed to move all students forward.  I encourage students to make mistakes, use big words, enter into debates and not be afraid.  It is through making mistakes, I tell them, that I can know what the next steps are in their learning.  All done in a supportive environment.

Give it a try; it’s not rocket science.  When we pay attention to the students they will show us what they need.  When we listen and watch, we will know what to teach.

Literacy in Minnesota

Literacy @ RiverviewIf you are interested in how Reader’s and Writer’s Workshop works in one school in Minnesota, check out the site Literacy @ Riverview.  The site gives an outline of expectations for reading and writing education.  It is a great site for new teachers who want a window into elementary literacy or experienced teachers who want a refresher.  There is also a section of resources in Spanish.

Check it out and see what you think:

Empanada Recipe

IngredientsDouble recipe!
2 pounds ground beef
2 or 3 chopped onions
3 or 4 chopped garlic cloves
2 T oil
½ c raisins
¼ t paprika
½ t cumin
½ t oregano
1 t salt
½ t pepper
1 can of black olives
4 hard-boiled eggs
1 beaten egg
(All of the spice quantities can change according to your taste.)

For the filling…
Soak the raisins in hot water for about an hour.  In a large frying pan fry the ground beef in the oil until browned.  Add the chopped onions and minced garlic and cook until the onions are mostly transparent.  Add cumin, oregano, salt, pepper and paprika (optional) and cook for three minutes.  Let the filling cool (overnight in fridge or just a few hours until cool).  Slice the eggs.

Dough for the crust
3 c flour
1 t salt
1 t baking powder
¼ c melted shortening
¼ c melted butter
¾ c warm milk + ¼ c warm water (or 1 c warm milk)

Mix the flour with the salt and baking powder.  Add the shortening, butter, milk and water.  Mix well, kneading until soft and flexible but not sticky.  Let rest for ½ hour and divide into 16 portions, ready for rolling out. (This number is flexible depending on the size of your empanadas)

To fill the crust…
Pre-heat the oven to 400º F.

With a rolling pin stretch each piece of dough and cut into a circle.  Begin filling the empanadas by putting the meat mixture in the middle of the dough; then add one slice of egg, a few raisins and 2 olive halves.  Wet the edges of the dough and close the dough, flipping over one half onto the other half and pinch the now moistened edges.  Lightly brush each empanada with raw egg (beaten).  Poke each empanada with a fork a few times, this reduces the inside pressure when cooking and helps prevent bursting at the seams.

Place on cookie sheet and bake for 20 minutes (until golden brown).   Let cool a bit before eating.


To Be Determined

A dry ink well leaves
Unfinished tales end-less

Post Navigation


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 147 other followers

%d bloggers like this: